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A World Effectively Controlled By The United Nations

A Preliminary Survey of One Form of a Stable Military Environment


 

Lincoln P. Bloomfield

Prepared for IDA in support of a study submitted to the Department of State under contract No. SCC 28270, dated February 24, 1961

The judgments expressed in this Study Memorandum are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute for Defense Analyses or of any agency of the United States Government

Special Studies Group

INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES

1710 H Street, N. W.

Washington 6, D.C.

March 10, 1962


 

FOREWORD


This paper was prepared for project VULCAN, a study of Arms Control and a Stable Military Environment, which was made by the Special Studies Group of IDA for the Department of State under contract No. SCC 28270, dated 24 February 1961. Dr. J. I. Coffey was the Project Leader.


The author, Dr. Lincoln P. Bloomfield, a consultant to the Special Studies Group, has written extensively on the role of the United Nations in international politics. He is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Arms Control Project at the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Judgments expressed are of course those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute for Defense Analyses or of any agency of the United States Government.


JAMES E. KING, JR.

Associate Director of Research


 

CONTENTS

SUMMARY

CHAPTER

INTRODUCTION


Framework of Study

Policy Background

Definitions


THE MODEL

Principal Features

Representation

Peaceful Change

Finances

ASSUMPTIONS

On Weapons and Technology

On the Political Environment


NATIONAL VERSUS INTERNATIONAL FORCE

Balance of Forces


PRINCIPAL PROBLEMS IN ACHIEVING A WORLD ORDER

Community and Consensus

Disarmament

Universality

Finances

Revision of the United Nations


EXPECTED PERFORMANCE OF THE MODEL

The Sources of Threat

Nuclear War – General and Limited

Conventional War

Proxy Aggression

Guerrilla War

Subversion and Psychological Warfare

Threats to Use Force

CONCLUSIONS


 

SUMMARY

A world effectively controlled by the United Nations is one in which "world government" would come about through the establishment of supranational institutions, characterized by mandatory universal membership and some ability to employ physical force. Effective control would thus entail a preponderance of political power in the hands of a supranational organization rather than in individual national units, and would assume the effective operation of a general disarmament agreement. While this supranational organization — the United Nations — would not necessarily be the organization as it now exists, the present UN Charter could theoretically be revised in order to erect such an organization equal to the task envisaged, thereby codifying a radical rearrangement of power in the world.

The principal features of a model system would include the following: (1) powers sufficient to monitor and enforce disarmament, settle disputes, and keep the peace —including taxing powers — with all other powers reserved to the nations; (2) an international force, balanced appropriately among ground, sea, air, and space elements, consisting of 500,000 men, recruited individually, wearing a UN uniform, and controlling a nuclear force composed of 50-100 mixed land-based mobile and undersea-based missiles, averaging one megaton per weapon; (3) governmental powers distributed among three branches so that primary functions would exist in some recognizable form in a bicameral legislative organ, an executive organ, and an expanded international judicial network; (4) compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court for both legal disputes and legal aspects of political disputes; (5) approximately 130 political subunits, all nominally independent states, within the system; (6) continued jurisdiction over cosmetic affairs by the national governments; and (7) unrestricted international inspection of all states against violation of the disarmament agreement, with permament (sic) inspection of nuclear research and power equipment, strategic areas and industries, administrative policies and operations, and other key and strategic points in the national economy.

The system of representation in the legislative body of the model government would have to include all the constituent units, with the voting procedure reflecting the relative size, power, and standing of the units. In the absence of individual veto rights, legislative power would be exercised on a weighted basis which acceptably combined population and capacity to contribute to the power of the system. No less important, and of crucial practicality in the effective operation of the model government, would be the financial problems. Finally, underlying the whole enterprise must be a realistic comprehension of the historical requirements for peaceful change.

Clearly, the structure of the model itself can be perceived more easily than the fundamental building blocks of consensus and community which would have to underlie it; although, should such a system ever come into being, it would thenceforth have its own inner dynamic. It is, nevertheless, the question of feasibility which is central to the realization of this model order: it may be unattainable when needed, and unneeded when attainable.

Read more at http://www.getusout.org/artman/publish/article_2.shtml

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